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Three Documents

By Jacob Koestler on Nov 9, 2012

A document on screen is always fiction: Bigfoot is found to be a more dedicated journalist disguised as the crytid and seen first-person through the amateur lens. The projection screen (within the screen) catches fire and one myth is set ablaze. The camera pulls focus to a television screen littered with Appalachian detritus set against a foggy mystic sunrise along a gravel road. The tracking is adjusted, and the landscape disappears into the static void.    

Introversion through Stop Animation

By on Nov 9, 2012

The stop animation process provides an interesting contrast to standard live action video or live performance. While the results are approximately similar (moving objects and characters), the method with which they are achieved is markedly different. While both processes require planning, the amount and type of preparation required to produce stop animation is significant. Stop animation demands a clear and marked methodical planning of every moment of time within that short sequence of motion. Every moment is carefully constructed to produce a result that is seemingly smooth and spontaneous. Every frame is carefully calculated to conform to larger context. Each frame plays an almost inconsequential, but important role in the overall result. In comparison, the capture of live action video occurs more fluidly and arguably more spontaneously. After the planning and preparation are over,...