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Marmalade

By Chet Miller

Here in the School of Theatre, for our first show, Mr. Marmalade, the director desired to have the titles of the scenes projected during the transition. To accomplish this, we used the standard front projection spot, which has been a go to in that space (We have had projections in that position for all the shows in the last two years) and again worked for us in this show. Since the world we’re inhabiting is imaginary, the set was a popup book. For the projection surface, we would fly in a chalk board and project the white text onto it to look like chalk writing. All the slides were built in Illustrator and exported as png images for the transparent background. The @lab’s 6k panasonic projector is absolutely amazing in live theatre. It’s actually punchy enough to work in a surprising amount of situations. One of my favourite aspects is the fact we can use the internal...

Three Documents

By Jacob Koestler

A document on screen is always fiction: Bigfoot is found to be a more dedicated journalist disguised as the crytid and seen first-person through the amateur lens. The projection screen (within the screen) catches fire and one myth is set ablaze. The camera pulls focus to a television screen littered with Appalachian detritus set against a foggy mystic sunrise along a gravel road. The tracking is adjusted, and the landscape disappears into the static void.    

Introversion through Stop Animation

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The stop animation process provides an interesting contrast to standard live action video or live performance. While the results are approximately similar (moving objects and characters), the method with which they are achieved is markedly different. While both processes require planning, the amount and type of preparation required to produce stop animation is significant. Stop animation demands a clear and marked methodical planning of every moment of time within that short sequence of motion. Every moment is carefully constructed to produce a result that is seemingly smooth and spontaneous. Every frame is carefully calculated to conform to larger context. Each frame plays an almost inconsequential, but important role in the overall result. In comparison, the capture of live action video occurs more fluidly and arguably more spontaneously. After the planning and preparation are over,...

Blandwich

By Nathan Prouty

I was invited to submit work to an anthology of artist’s interpretations of the Sandwich, to be published in 2013 by StarGods Press, an independent publisher based out of Toronto, Canada. My medium of choice is ceramics, but I have also been working in digital printmaking and screenprinting. For this project, I wanted to use the aesthetics of traditional 2-D cell animation. After creating a sandwich form out of clay, I photographed it with a model. The final print will be two layers – the photograph of the model holding the sandwich that has been desaturated of all color, laying underneath an acetate layer of just the sandwich and cord. This acetate layer will be printed in color. I am exploring many ideas in the studio, but for this project I am interested in the idea of ‘overlaying’ vibrant, lively information over a base layer of blandness. This project will...

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